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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 2, 2018 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins — this is outside source. iran's supreme leader has called protestors "enemies," and alleges foreign interference. him, new after six days of anti—government protests in iran, and the deaths —— after six days of anti—government protests in iran, and the deaths of 22 people, its supreme leader has spoken. hello, i'm ros atkins — this is outside source. iran's supreme leader has called protestors "enemies," and alleges ‘s foreign interference. here's how the trump administration reacted. the iranian people are angry at the rising tide of corruption in their daily lives. the people are tired of paying the price for their violent and corrupt rulers. looks like south korea and north korea could talk directly — next week. and kim jong—un is using these two north korean skaters and the winter olympics as his reason why. logan paul is one of youtube‘s biggest stars — he's posted this video. from the bottom of my heart, i am sorry. he's apologised to all of japan after publishing a video in which he laughs about filming a japanese man who appears to have taken his life. welcome to the first edition of
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outside source in 2018. happy new year. the middle eastern editor jeremy bowen has just arrived on set, so you can contact us with any questions for him. after six days of anti—government protests in iran, and the deaths of 22 people, its supreme leader has spoken. we have also heard from the us ambassador to the un. here are both of them. translation: following recent events the enemies have united to create problems for the islamic republic, using all their weapons. we all know that's complete nonsense. the demonstrations are completely spontaneous. they are virtually in every city in iran. this is the precise picture
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of a long and oppressed people rising up against their dictators. nikki haley also said washington wants an emergency meeting of the un security council. these demonstrations started on thursday in iran's second largest city, mashhad. you can see it there in the north—east. but by saturday, many more people and places were involved, including the capital, tehran. it's worth noting that on saturday there was also another demonstration in tehran — but this one was sanctioned by the authorities and commemorated the defeat of the 2009 protest movement. but let's stay focused on the anti—government protests, and the most important question, why are they happening now? this is the view of one analyst. if you go back to may of this year, when hassan rouhani was re—elected with a landslide 2a million voters backing him, they voted for him
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because he made a simple but powerful promise. he said, "when i'm re—elected there will be more political freedoms in this country." he hasn't delivered on that, at all. in fact, what he's done is turned away from the reformist grass movements and turned to the hardliners. remember president rouhani has also repeatedly promised to fix the iranian economy, and there is undoubtedly work to do. the cost of living is going up, unemployment is at 11%, and double that among young people. bear that in mind, as we look at this from reuters. 2796, 27%, that statistic. this is a run‘s deputy interior minister. bbc monitoring watches the world's media — it's been studying footage of the protests. in a recent briefing, it notes, "the diversity of slogans illustrate the absence of a coherent message or aim of the demonstrations, which also completely lack leaders." they tell us.
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that may be, but the authorities are taking them seriously. there have been more than a50 arrests in tehran province. and messaging apps like telegram are being restricted. here's the tech commentator mahsa alimardani on that decision. this platform is for communicating between family members, friends, getting information from thy aspera persian media or from getting information from thy aspera persian media orfrom local media, and just getting everyday updates like traffic and whether it is very centralised to this one platform, so when the block occurred there has been a rush to, you know, get on to connect to this device that you previously didn't have to. if you want to read more about the role social media is playing in iran right now, there's a piece by mahsa on the politico website now. next, to bbc persian‘sjiyar gol. for a sense of the government
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response. in sensitive areas they have placed those security forces, but despite all of this we have received footage that shows gatherings of people, but those apps where people were communicating and sending messages, and footage to us has been limited and blocked. what are you hearing from your contacts about the motivation of these demonstrators? is this aboutjust improving living standards, or is it about something more fundamental? i think it is about much more than just the economy — yes, it started with the economic situation. they were angry about employment, inflation, and what's going on in the country, but as days passed some of those protesters became political. some other groups, university students, teachers, workers, some activists, theyjoined them and the slogans became more political and people — for example, one of the slogans was, why is iran spending billions and billions of dollars in countries like lebanon, like yemen, like syria, yet their own people are, many of them, living in abject poverty? why is that money not
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being invested in the country, invested in creating jobs for young people? as you would expect donald trump has been tweeting about what has been happening in iran, here he is saying the people of iran are finally acting against the corrupt and brutal iranians regime. he goes say these people have little food and no human rights. "america is watching." there wasn't much chance of iran reacting well to that. the reality is that the us has very little leverage on iran, and president trump has very little credibility inside the country, given the fact that he imposed the travel ban very early on in his administration, that primarily targeted the iranian citizens, who have never been involved in any acts of terrorism in the us. so i doubt that his words would have that much traction within the population, but they will certainly be exploited by the government to portray the protesters as foreign lackeys. europe's approach appears to be
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different to this than the usa. this is from patrick wintour, and he also says as well is this the french foreign minister is supposed to be going to tehran on friday but made the load. i have news for you on that, because this is writers telling us that is exactly what will happen. the french presidency has confirmed that after call with president rouhani the foreign minister will not be going there any more. that is some of the international reaction, and we have to see all of this in the context of a run‘s complex relationships in the middle east. this is philippa thomas, explaining. iran isa thomas, explaining. iran is a predominantly shia muslim state and its growing sphere of influence across the middle east has ended many enemies. none greater
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than sunni saudi arabia. the two matt cava naugh diplomatic than sunni saudi arabia. the two matt cavanaugh diplomatic ties and are suspicious of each other‘s drawing power in the region. they are facing off against each other in are facing off against each other in a number of proxy conflicts. iran has close ties with lebanon, especially the political party hezbollah and its militia force. iran provides them with millions of dollars in supplies and weaponry, but in november the saudi arabian crowned prince backed efforts to undermine hezbollah in beirut, and boost the lebanese prime minister. saudi arabia and iran face off in another proxy war in the region in yemen. a saudi led coalition is fighting the houthi rebels, but tehran baxter houthis, who were in a form of alliance against the former president against the sunnis, and when they switched sides and sought peace, he was killed. iran's hatred
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of israel is well—known, with no diplomatic ties. doesn't even recognise the jewish state, diplomatic ties. doesn't even recognise thejewish state, instead calling it a zionist regime. not surprisingly, the endorsed the creation of a palestinian state in iran and the finance various palestinian cause is, among them the islamicjihad and palestinian cause is, among them the islamic jihad and how palestinian cause is, among them the islamicjihad and how mass —— hamas groups. we can talk to the middle east editor for the bbc, jeremy bowen. would you say these claims are true? the americans are encouraging them. donald trump is tweeting that this is a wonderful development, effectively, but, you know, if they have evidence the cia is behind all of this, fine, let's see it. there's a long history in a run of foreign intervention, governments being overdrawn, in the 50s and elected leader was overthrown by the americans, the cia and britain's m16 in the 50s, so
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those comments for iranians pressed some important buttons but, norma, right now, to me it looks like a pretty spontaneous, initially very spontaneous anyway, outburst of protest —— no, right now to me. why has it spread quickly? people are discontented, and because as well i think they are pretty sick of living in an authoritarian society. think they are pretty sick of living in an authoritarian societylj think they are pretty sick of living in an authoritarian society. i guess one of the pressures on president rouhani, he promised something different when he won the most recent election and he is struggling to deliver that. he promised he would turn the economy round as well and that has been hurt by years of sanctions, and years of corruption, mismanagement as well. he said he would do something about all those things and, yes, sanctions have gone away partly, and we can speak a bit more about that, but the internal staff, the corruption, mismanagement, inefficiencies, he
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has not sorted that kind of thing outcome and that is disappointing quite a lot of people. and he has been the butt of quite a few of the slogans as well in these demonstrations. his book about the sanctions and let's get into that. there is a bit of a divide between president trump who loathes the deal president trump who loathes the deal president obama cut with the iranians, and those who love this deal. yes, the future of iran's nuclear industry, if you like. would they be trying to create nuclear weapons? the americans and the israelis, the british as well, they believe they were, and the question 110w believe they were, and the question now is what happens with that particular deal. later on this month. there is a moment in fact when president trump has to sign some very important documents which will continue the suspension of some of these sanctions, and if he does not sign them, perhaps he will decide that this is a time to put more pressure on the regime in
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tehran and he might consider this would be his opportunity as well of finally doing down what for him is this hated agreement with iran about its nuclear future. so this hated agreement with iran about its nuclearfuture. so later on this hated agreement with iran about its nuclear future. so later on this month there could be a real flash point and if these protests continue i think they may well feed into president trump's decision—making. you read there in 2009 when there we re you read there in 2009 when there were much bigger protests. how do you compare what you saw them with what you are viewing from afar at the moment? —— you were there into this inane. in 2009 there were a lot of people really angry that an election they believed had been stolen from them —— when you were there in 2009. these protests are different. in 2009 there were politicians in charge of those protest essentially who since then have been under various different kinds of arrests. this time there are no recognisable national leaders who are part of it. there was one very clear objective
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of the protests, to do something about the election, and it morphed a bit into criticism of the regime. now there are loads of different things, starting with the economy and going into politics, loads of things we have talked about. now, that could be seen as a weakness but it could also be a strength, cause it could also be a strength, cause it is harderfor the resume to deal with something which keeps popping up with something which keeps popping up all over the place. in tehran, you know, it came down by the end when they were really cracking down on them, to demonstrations in a few different streets. jeremy, thank you very much indeed. jeremy bowen, the bbc‘s middle east editor. if you wa nt bbc‘s middle east editor. if you want regular updates from jeremy, you can follow him on twitter. and i can't believe jeremy you can follow him on twitter. and i can't believejeremy has not been following this... the israeli legislator has passed new legislation saying two thirds of the parliament would have to support
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giving any more territory to the palestinians. the biggest rise in train fares in the last five years commuters face this morning as they returned to work after the christmas break. the average ticket price went up by 3.4%. labour has renewed its call for the railway to be re—nationalised — while the government and the rail industry say the fares will help pay for improvements to the network. if we can continue to make savings by bringing the railways back into public ownership and stop wasting money on franchising, on the complexity of the arrangements between all these different companies, and we don't pay out dividends to state owned companies across the channel, we can keep that money in—house. across the channel, we can keep that money in-house. for every pound passenger pays in fares, 97p goes into running and improving the railway, but also with more people using the railway it means we have
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more money to invest. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is: the supreme leader of iran has called protesters enemies and this follows days of protest. let's look at the main stories from the bbc world service. the ambassador to the un says the usa will withhold millions of dollars in aid to pakistan for failing to cooperate with the fight against terror. president trump's tweets on the subject have already angered pakistan. in bangladesh, an arrest warrant in connection with petrol bomb attacks on a bus during a protest in 2015 that killed eight people. that is from bbc bengali. lots of you have been reading this
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on the bbc website, the weather getting bitterly cold in the usa, reaching as far as florida with warnings as far as texas to the atla ntic warnings as far as texas to the atlantic coast. the east of the usa is also set for another freeze at the end of the week. this is logan paul, 22, and a youtube star, and he has issued an apology after issuing a video that show the suicide of a man injapan. the video had already been watched 6 million times and of course copies are still circulating although it has been taken down. this is his apology. it was obviously plan and the reactions you saw were raw, unfiltered. none of us knew how to react or how to feel. i should never have posted the video. i should have put the cameras down. and stop recording what we were going
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through. there were a lot of things i should have done differently, but i didn't, i should have done differently, but ididn't, and i should have done differently, but i didn't, and for that, from the bottom of my heart, i'm sorry. i didn't, and for that, from the bottom of my heart, i'm sorrylj have been talking to the tech reporter at buzzfeed, katie, have been talking to the tech reporterat buzzfeed, katie, in have been talking to the tech reporter at buzzfeed, katie, in new york. yuji peiser three strikes policy, —— youtube has a three stroke policy. they took this down after one strike, but i think it raises questions. his fans are typically young teenagers, tweens, kids, andi typically young teenagers, tweens, kids, and i think it has left a lot of people wondering, what are these young people seeing? what are they doing, youtube to shake this. he makes a lot of money with youtube and they make a lot of money with them —— to shape this. what policy protocols are being put in place to make sure completely tasteless video like this is no longer posted?” guess the popularity of some of
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these youtubers is that they are seen as these youtubers is that they are seen as not being monitored by youtube or indeed by anybody else? seen as not being monitored by youtube or indeed by anybody else ?|j think that is certainly true. youtube is not like a television network. they don't own logan paul. he is free to upload videos, as are you or i, as much as he wants. he shot videos for their premium products but that was in 2016, and i think itjust products but that was in 2016, and i think it just leaves products but that was in 2016, and i think itjust leaves a lot of questions of moderation, and what are the rules, and, you know, how did he not know in the first place that posting a video like this would bea that posting a video like this would be a terrible idea? is there nobody guiding or shaping the types of content young people are seeing from these incredibly popular creators. content young people are seeing from these incredibly popular creatorslj was watching not just these incredibly popular creatorslj was watching notjust the video but responses to it. i saw one already has 20 million viewers and almost 200,000 comments responding to it. i
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guess the whole story is highlighting the reach that some of these youtube stars have? yes, and there have been a lot of people who have actually come out in support of logan paul. within the youtube community there is this sort of defensiveness of people who think youtube is too restrictive and there is this war between the creators and youtube. it is a very strange confusing tension there. let's turn to the middle east, because as you will know resolving the conflict between the israelis and the palestinians is incredibly difficult and in the israeli parliament may have made it even more difficult. this vote by israeli mps would virtually make any peace deal with the palestinians that involves ceding control of part ofjerusalem much more difficult to get through the israeli parliament, because now instead of taking 61 votes out of a possible 120, it would take at two thirds majority, that 80 votes, and
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this really gets to an issue at the heart of the israel palestinian conflict, because the eastern part ofjerusalem was captured by israel in the 1967 middle east war and it was later annexed in a move not internationally recognised by israel. one israeli minister who pushed for this moving legislation said it would ensure the city of jerusalem remained the israeli united capital and fortified israel, whereas the palestinian president's office said this, coupled with the announcement last month that president trump recognise jerusalem as israel's capital, amounted to a declaration of war on the palestinian people. time for business and we will do a health check on amazon. it says last year it shipped over 5 billion items worldwide just as part of its prime service, a subscription service. it also last year expanded into groceries and pharmaceuticals. let's
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talk to samira hussain, live with us from new york. i don't know what to compare that figure of 5 billion with, samira. is that standard for amazon? it is pretty significant, especially when you consider the fa ct especially when you consider the fact that back in 2005 is when they launched amazon prime, and if you think back to that time, everybody really panned the idea, saying people would not want to pay that money to be able to ship freely have this kind of fast shipping, fast forward to 2017 and 5 billion packages have been sent. we also don't really have numbers on how many members are part of this prime service, and amazon does not really reveal those figures. one journalist did take and find that in one of its filings, and it was later confirmed by amazon, that at one point they had some 20 million subscribers to
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the amazon prime service. now we're pharmaceuticals, health care, other things added. do you think amazon will get so big the regulators will be interested? so far, not yet, but it certainly has a lot of companies really worried. they will be looking ata really worried. they will be looking at a lot of things when it comes to amazon 2018. there will be put their new headquarters? there has been a lot of speculation about that. and just recently there was an article written by a prominent analyst here in the usa who suggested the possible next acquisition for amazon could in fact be the store target. that could be a target. see you later in the week, samira in new york. now, 2017 was the safest year in the history of passenger airlines, no fatalaccident in the history of passenger airlines, no fatal accident on passenger jets, airlines, no fatal accident on passengerjets, and airlines, no fatal accident on passenger jets, and he airlines, no fatal accident on passengerjets, and he was one a nalyst passengerjets, and he was one analyst on why that was. aviation with large passenger aircraft is
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indeed incredibly safe. that is not to say it is not without its risks. there were a significant number of nonfatal accidents including two jet passenger aircraft, but this really isa passenger aircraft, but this really is a very safe form of transport, and modern aircraft and engines are incredibly robust and reliable pieces of equipment. one of the essentials of aviation safety as we learn from our previous mistakes, we put new technologies into aeroplanes and example the crash in canada of a turboprop before christmas, it didn't catch fire. aircraft are more fire retardant, easier to evacuate from, so even when you do have an accident, the chances of it killing eve ryo ne accident, the chances of it killing everyone are less and less these days. long may that safety record continue. if you are watching outside source towards the end of 2017 you will know that we were speaking about bitcoin and off a lot, crypto currency, and we were reporting on it getting up to
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$16,000 per coin, and it was going up $16,000 per coin, and it was going up and down, and you will not be able to trade it in the egypt if you are watching their because it has been prohibited. bbc arabic‘s reporter has more from cairo. bitcoin has been in the headlines triggering debate almost all over the world, and egypt is no exception to that. the digital currency has now been deemed as prohibited in islamic shall you law, and according to the edict, using bitcoin made risk even burning in some nations and some cases. we have come here to hear what people actually think. translation: what you mean virtual currency? i have to touch the currency currency? i have to touch the currency to use it. i prefer our own money, people know it and know how to use it. it's a new thing that i don't know about but everyone uses. i might
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think about it. the currency is not very common to use in egypt. there is no official estimate as to how many people actually use bitcoin here, but some experts told us it is limited to dozens experts told us it is limited to d oze ns of experts told us it is limited to dozens of users, who became interested after bitcoin hit a peak at some point last year of $17,000. bbc cairo. thanks for that. if you have a smartphone while you are watching and want updates from here and the bbc newsroom remember you can download the bbc news that from your app store, just search for bbc news and you will find it very easily. when we come back on outside source, we will have a number of stories for you, including israel making a push to send thousands of eritreans making a push to send thousands of eritrea ns and sudanese making a push to send thousands of eritreans and sudanese home. good
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evening. at home wet and windy weather is the primary concern right now, but on the other side of the atla ntic now, but on the other side of the atlantic it is not wet and windy, but cold weather that causes issues. the cold has been very long—lasting across north america. another cold night in store tonight. these are the lows we are expecting. dallas, texas, down 2—5, and minneapolis, —17, so after that exceptionally cold start, temperatures will struggle to recover “— temperatures will struggle to recover —— down to —5 in dallas, texas. new york city during the middle of the afternoon, no better than —2. 5 degrees in dallas is a slight improvement on the last day orso, and slight improvement on the last day or so, and later in the week we are watching an area of low pressure, and some uncertainty aboutjust how close to the eastern seaboard this will get, but it does look like it will get, but it does look like it will bring some significant snow across new york and up into new
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england towards the end of the week, which could cause some travel problems. now to south—east asia in this area of cloud, this tropical depression that has brought a lot of rain to the philippines, a bit of uncertainty about exactly where this storm will track next. it does not look like it will strengthen particularly but it could bring some rain eventually towards vietnam and some other computer not wood models drifted away to the north. keep an eye on that because there could well be some further flooding —— some other computer models. and this picture is quite dramatic, showing a chain of thundery downpours from the far north down the east coast of australia and these will continue in places during wednesday but for the bulk of australia things are looking try with some spells of sunshine. on the cool side for this time of year in melbourne with highs of 20 degrees. now, closer to in melbourne with highs of 20 degrees. now, closerto home in melbourne with highs of 20 degrees. now, closer to home in europe, this area of low pressure, storm eleanor, which will bring some very wet and windy weather tonight through the british isles, it will
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then move its way into continental europe and across the low countries into germany, and noticed the squeeze in isobars. there could be some very strong squeeze in isobars. there could be some very strong winds, gales or severe gales, and then further east some outbreaks of rain and wet weather also sinking southward across germany and france, bringing snow over the alps. you will notice temperatures around this area are not particularly low, and that combination of snow which will really pay a lot over the next few days, and those temperatures which will generally be fairly high for this time of year, it brings quite a significant risk of avalanches which could cause some travel problems. temperatures in geneva, nine or 10 degrees on thursday and friday, more rain and snow over the mountains so a significant risk of avalanche. back home on wednesday, a windy day with a mix of sunshine and showers, and more details on that rate here in halfan and more details on that rate here in half an hour. and more details on that rate here in halfan hour. —— right and more details on that rate here in half an hour. —— right here. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source, and these are the main stories here in the bbc newsroom. iran's supreme leader has called protestors ‘enemies' — and is alleging foreign
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interference. it's his first comments after six days of protests. here's how the trump administration reacted. the iranian people are angry at the rising tide of corruption in their daily lives. the people are tired of paying the price for their violent and corrupt rulers. south korea has proposed high—level talks with north korea next week to discuss its possible participation in the winter olympics. the development comes a day after kim jong—un said he was open to dialogue. an american youtube star, logan paul, has prompted a barrage of criticism after he posted a video which showed the body of an apparent suicide victim in japan. logan paul has now apologised. south korea wants direct talks with north korea —
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it's even calling this a "ground—breaking chance" to improve relations. it's a response to kim jong un saying he's willing to hold direct talks about sending a team to the olympics in south korea. this is president trump's take — via a tweet. that's president trump — this is south korea's president moon. we welcome the north korean leader, kimjong—un, we welcome the north korean leader, kim jong—un, that he expressed a willingness to send to the olympics. i believe that this is in response to our proposal to make the olympics an opportunity to improve inter—korean relations and peace.
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in his statement, kim jong—un raised the possibility of sending a north korean team to the winter olympics in pyongchang in south korea next month. south korea's moved at speed. it's suggesting talks at the panmunjom peace house onjanuary 9th — a week's time. the peace house is in an area that straddles the border between the north and south. by the way, only two north koreans have qualified for the games. they're both figure skaters. more details coming into the newsroom , more details coming into the newsroom, the us state department have said it's up to south korea as to whether to hold these talks but washington is sceptical of kim jong—un's sincerity, if such talks
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happen. that is reuters quoting the us state department. the americans standing back from this. a lot of people waiting to see whether kim jong—un would send a team to talk to the south koreans. we will see. well, celia hatton is the asia pacific editor here in the bbc newsroom. this is her analysis of the possibility of talks. a lot of theories are swirling around north korea's motivations. some people believe that economic sanctions imposed on north korea are finally beginning to bite. it really is hurting the north korean economy on almost every level. it is thought that maybe the north korean leader, kimjong—un, that maybe the north korean leader, kim jong—un, his thinking that maybe the north korean leader, kimjong—un, his thinking is that maybe the north korean leader, kim jong—un, his thinking is that he could give in to a saido concession. he could agree to talks and set at the table and perhaps extract some monetary gains, some aid or a climb of sanctions without having to give up of sanctions without having to give up anything tangible that is important to him, namely north korea's nuclear weapons programme. that is one theory. from the south
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koreans perspective, their president complained on the idea that there should be more engagement. he was one of the architects of south korea's now dormant sunshine policy, the idea that south korea and north korea should warmer relations and back when he was a presidential adviser, he was the one who pushed the idea that the two should have economic ties, culturalties, the idea that the two should have economic ties, cultural ties, social ties. that policy is really long dead, but he has continued to express his belief that negotiations are express his belief that negotiations a re really express his belief that negotiations are really important. so, it is no surprise that south korea jumped at the chance to meet with the north koreans face—to—face. another big story coming out of israel today. the government has told thousands of african migrants to leave the country or face imprisonment —
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and is offering up to $3,500 if they leave within the next 90 days. this the migrants are mostly from eritrea and sudan. these are pictures of some eritreans at a church service in tel aviv. the vast majority of these migrants are seeking asylum — and say they've fled persecution and conflict. but the authorities regard them as economic migrants. here is prime minister benjamin netanyahu here is prime minister benjamin neta nyahu talking earlier. translation: we have removed 20,000 of existing infiltrators using various measures. now it's increased removal, thanks to an international agreement i reached, allowing us to move the 40,000 remaining infiltrators without their consent. now this new order exempts children, elderly people, and victims of slavery and human trafficking.
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there has been increased monitoring of the libyan coast line in the mediterranean which has seen a drop of 70% of migration travel since july. now we have a special report on the fate of african migrants returning home from libya. increased monitoring of libya's coastline has seen migrant travel drop 70% sincejuly. this has left thousands of men stuck in libya and vulnerable to abuse. some, mainly from nigeria, have now been repatriated. stephanie hegarty has been to benin in southern nigeria to meet them. many of those who've walked the streets of benin dreamed of going to europe. jackson and felix almost made it. but they were arrested in a boat off the coast of libya and sent to prison. they said when they were no longer needed they were dumped in the desert. rescued by a man driving by, they were repatriated to nigeria with the help of the un.
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we spoke to several nigerian migrants, crosschecking the details of their stories, and each told us of the same horrifying trend. prison authorities leasing or selling migrants to local businesses as labour. it's a new development in a dark and brutal industry in which traffickers and prison guards extort migrants, forcing them to buy their freedom. this man was arrested in libya in 2015 and brought to prison. he says the man bought his freedom and forced him to work for nothing. after three months, he refused to continue. back in prison, he was told he was going to be deported.
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instead he was taken here for seven months. how many people did you see die? almost 20 or 30. here, at this hotel, 200 men and women havejust arrived from libya, they are being processed and received by authorities here. many of them have stories of abuse and mistreatment at the hands of authorities, and libyan detention centres, where they are held. at least three people i spoke to so far told me they were forced to so far told me they were forced to work for free or sold as slaves. again and again, the prisoners
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mentioned as a place of terrible abuse. it is run by libya's ministry of interior which itself is run by two militia groups. libya is in the middle of a civil war and these militia are only nominally under the un recognised government in tripoli. the libyan and interior ministry did not respond to our attempts to set up not respond to our attempts to set up an interview. the us migration agency says there are 700 migrants -- 700,000 agency says there are 700 migrants —— 700,000 migrants still stuck in libya. governments have stepped up their efforts to get citizens home and thousands have been repatriated in the last few weeks. carrying on talk trauma, those that do come home had to begin the hard work of rebuilding their lives. stephanie hegarty, bbc news, nigeria. don't forget you can get much more detail on our top stories on our website... the 2018 pyeongchang winter olympics
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begin injust over a month's time in south korea. whilst concerns about the on—going conflict with north korea and the russian doping scandal have dominated much of the build—up, the british team are aiming to make history at the games themselves. bbc sport's nick hope takes a look at some of the best british prospects in path to pyeongchang... it takes a special kind of athlete to succeed at the winter olympics. traditionally, british success has been sporadic at best. but in recent yea rs, been sporadic at best. but in recent years, team gb has finallyjoined the party. lizzie arnold is the olympic champion, my goodness! bella fourgb olympic champion, my goodness! bella four gb medals during sochi 2014 and
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that could yet be upgraded to a record haul of five with a bobsleigh bronze following the russian doping scandal. but british athletes are winning more major medals now than at any point in history. so there is every chance that the bjorn chang 2018 and south korea could be britain's best ever games —— pyongchang. one of britain's best multi—medal prospects is elise christie, she will compete in three events. since the last games she's become a world champion but is looking to put her in thick demons firmly behind her after a devastating sochi 2014. they've gone down! i can't believe she's been penalised again! it has been tough, i cannot even describe how hard it
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was. i suffered a lot after it in my life, in my normal life too. i had a crash at the games, the korean girl was taken out and i received a lot of online abuse and death threats from the south koreans. it changed me as from the south koreans. it changed measa from the south koreans. it changed me as a person, a lost —— i lost a lot of confidence from that but since then i've had a turnaround. she's the first british woman to win a short track world title. people became fans and they were sorry for how people me. a majority of the south koreans already support me. it's nice to see how much i've moved forward since then. i'm a totally different skater. i've developed so much but i don't know howl different skater. i've developed so much but i don't know how i would survive if it happens again. when i go to the olympics i'm hoping to win a gold medal. definitely wanted more than anything else but i needed with
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what happened in sochi, to get redemption for any mistakes i made. ifi redemption for any mistakes i made. if i won gold, it would be undescribable. the british bobsleigh four man team finished fifth, an agonising 0.1 one seconds from medals in 2014 but they are in line foran medals in 2014 but they are in line for an upgrade to bronze after the disqualification of the russian team for doping offences. corruption on an unprecedented scale, 1000 russian athletes are accused of doping... the russian government organised and directed a sophisticated doping programme. great britain looked set to wina programme. great britain looked set to win a bobsleigh bronze medal, nearly four years after the sochi olympics. a moment has been stolen. i feel
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like we fought so hard, knowing that we we re like we fought so hard, knowing that we were good enough to get on the podium. it is difficult to take. gray as we are seeing in all sports now, this is happening all too frequently. it is a sad state. it would have been a massive family achievement more than anything. funding would have been much higher. the personal reward of it, that potentially would have meant the opportunity for us to further our careers. opportunity for us to further our careers. i need a medal. how much would you like it to be resolved in pyongchang? one of the things that's always mentioned is how do you feel about your moment been stolen from you? in some ways it can be
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corrected by presenting a medal in bjorn chang. —— in pyongchang. corrected by presenting a medal in bjorn chang. —— in pyongchang! silver for great britain! you have another chance to do it at the games themselves, the team is going in the right direction. it is, the possibilities are huge for this team. the british four-man team from sochi 2014 should learn whether they will receive a retrospective bronze medal by late january. sliding sports will not enter the winter paralympics until beijing 2022 but for pyongchang 2018, britain still possess several medal prospects. these are the ones to watch for the paralympics gb... like britain's wheelchair curlers, gb olympic colours have enjoyed plenty of medal success in recent games, the women won at bronze while the men got silver in sochi 2014 and
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both collective european honours in the last few months, suggesting that they are arguably in career—best form. both teams will be boosted by the presence of these two. evil skip the presence of these two. evil skip the women's top while the boys will line upfor the women's top while the boys will line up for the gb men. it will make things more exciting and extra special. not every day you can compete at the olympics alongside two of your brothers, with great britain on your back and obviously family watching. it makes it really exciting. i guess there is some added pressure, having been medallists before. you have a podium to step up to but there is nothing stopping us, we will be as good as last time, if not even better! the winter olympics have been revitalised by freestyle skiing and
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snowboarding events in the 21st century and great britain finally claimed a first—ever winter olympic medal on the snow withjennyjones snapping upa medal on the snow withjennyjones snapping up a bronze medal. although she isn't competing any more, there is plenty more... i spend more than quarter of a century reporting on winter sport and i can say hand on heart going into pyongchang, britain has never had so many medal contenders... firstly, you have to talk about katie ormerod, she just missed out on sochi four years ago and since then, she has established herself as one of the best big air and slopestyle riders on the tour. the next rider to talk about is billie morgan, the first man to land the hallowed quad core, the biggest trick in snowboarding right now. he's another serious contender. jamie nicholls is my dark horse
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pick, pound for pound one of the best rail riders in the world and has been working hard. he is a brilliant all—round rider and can be a serious hope for a medal. we cannot forget about the skiers, there is no shortage of talent in that pool! james woods is top of the list, fifth in sochi while carrying a hip injury, the last 12 months have been a brilliant build—up to the games. he's had by games and world cup gold medals. you have katie summerhays, she has banked a silver on the world cup already this year. i don't know about you but i am very excited about team gb's prospects in bjorn chang! —— in pyongchang. there is plenty of medal potential from the freestyle perspective but less look at team gb's other prospects on the path to pyongchang. britain has struggled in
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alpine skiing for decades but slalom specialist dave riding now has world cup specialist dave riding now has world cu p su ccess specialist dave riding now has world cup success to his name. first, this competitor competing as a mother, she gave birth to her daughter in 2016. she's already training her for a future in the sport! ice dancers penny coomes and nick buckland have been one of sport's most unlucky duosin been one of sport's most unlucky duos in recent years. butland needed heart surgery before the last olympics and penny coomes shattered her knee in 2016. now they are back on the up. andrew musgrave is another certainly on top of his game, and competes in one of the olympics toughest events. cross—country skiing. the british bobsleigh team had all of their support on hold before the games but a crowdfunding campaign saw them raise over £40,000. also keep an eye out for laura dees in skeleton. a
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welsh woman one world cup honours in recent yea rs welsh woman one world cup honours in recent years and is looking to make an impact in her olympic debut... britain's leading slider remains lizzie arnold. the olympic champion from sochi 2014 who took a year—long career break since the last games. she has returned refreshed but has struggled to find consistency of old... lizzie arnold is the olympic champion. my goodness! since i was a kid i wanted to go to the olympics. to say i'm an olympian and a gold medallist, that is mind blowing. after sochi, there was a niggling thing that i hadn't yet been a world cup champion or european champion. my cup champion or european champion. my mind skipped immediately to that. to be able to achieve all four titles with them 407 days, in two seasons, was awesome but i was so exhausted. i'm glad i took the time.
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training was much harder than i remembered. it is constant. everything we do is in a basement, at the gym, lifting weights and trying to get stronger and faster. the past 18 months, i think it has been very up and down. lizzie arnold ta kes been very up and down. lizzie arnold takes the bronze medal! she is way backin takes the bronze medal! she is way back in tenth of rococo position! she may struggle to get another heat after that run. at the moment my results are not where i want them to be. i believe in myself and i have confidence. the goal of trying to become the first british winter olympian to retain my title is so motivating. that gets me out of bed every morning. as you've been seeing, with more
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medal prospects for great britain across winter sports than at any point in history, there's every chance that bjorn chang 2018 could be record—breaking for great britain... —— pyongchang 2018. there will be full coverage of the winter olympics on the bbc sport website. that's all from me, back the same time tomorrow for more outside source. a stormy start to 2018 but let me show you the big picture first of all. a look at north america. here, we have some very all. a look at north america. here, we have some very cold weather developing. blue colours here, a big dip in thejet stream, bringing in
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cold airfrom arctic dip in thejet stream, bringing in cold air from arctic canada. the jet strea m cold air from arctic canada. the jet stream shoots across the atlantic. a very powerful jet stream stream shoots across the atlantic. a very powerfuljet stream with that in turn, stalling underneath, closer to home, closer to the ground. this vortex of storm and another crossing the uk. bringing some disruptive weather. through the early hours of the morning we will have seen winds of up to 90 miles an hour on exposed coasts, 70 or more, and wide across the south. 50 or 60, 70 miles an hour further south. even the south. 50 or 60, 70 miles an hourfurther south. even more. a rough start of the day. the winds continued to blow hard through the morning and into the afternoon on wednesday. gale force winds, then we will see more disruption in suburban areas, some trees down. also some sunshine, it isn't all bad. there will be lulls in the wind and glimmers of sunshine. as we head
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into thursday, remnants of storm eleanor. another low—pressure system. some gale force winds, not the level of eleanor but some across the level of eleanor but some across the south coast for some time on thursday, windy in western areas. more run—of—the—mill, a winter gale. on thursday night, into friday, we see that pressure pulling into the north sea. on friday itself, some sunshine and rain. it looks like there will be a swathe airframe in northern areas of england, and in wales. turning wintry across the scottish hills. winds changing direction, dipping the way down to single figures, about 10 degrees there. in the channel islands. a marked change as we head towards friday and the weekend, these isobars coming in from the north, that's the wind direction, it follows these lines so look at these
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northerly winds, some showers around and across the north. mostly across the hills but not exclusively. temperatures are only four agrees, turning colder into the weekend, on saturday and sunday, it is looking chilly. there will also be some sunshine, a possibility of frost and fog. but if you are wrapped up warm, it won't be too bad a weekend. beyond that, into sunday night and monday, high—pressure establishes itself across the uk and essentially that means a block in the weather pattern. running up against it, they cannot go any further towards the east. that's what high—pressure does. racing across the atlantic, but we get an arm of the jet stream from the north. we will have that cold aircoming from the north. we will have that cold air coming from the north. it looks like the second week of
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january the winds will fall lighter and we see some frost and fog forming. short—term we have storm eleanor and some wind and rain before it comes down. tonight at ten, riot police on the streets across iran amid the biggest anti—government demonstrations for a decade. at least 22 people have died during six days of demonstrations across the country. iran's supreme leader has blamed foreign enemies for causing the unrest. we'll be asking how serious these protests are for the iranian government and what impact they could have on the region. thousands of routine operations postponed this month because of sustained pressure on the nhs in england — one doctor says conditions are the worst he's seen. i want to do the best i can for the patients that i'm seeing. i want to do the best i can. but i'm not being given the resources to do that. the biggest increase in railfares
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for five years.
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